PUBLIC SPEAKING: STRATEGY FOR A GREAT PRESENTATION

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PUBLIC SPEAKING: STRATEGY FOR A GREAT PRESENTATION

Public speaking isn’t easy but is a necessary skill for many in the business world. Whether it is a boardroom presentation or an update to shareholders/staff members, most managers will be required to present at some point. Here is a presentation strategy to help you to up your game.

Start and finish strong: A good talk is all about bringing your audience on a journey which should have a beginning, middle and an end. Make sure you have a great opening line / anecdote and a strong point to finish on. Your opening point might be to emphasise the topic of your talk. Perhaps you want to summarise the issues that you are going to address or maybe you want to identify a particular problem. Your closing should provide a brief summary of what you have covered along with a couple of key points.

Make it personal and honest: People love hearing a story and enjoy it all the more when it is well told and they can relate to it. Make your story personal and honest. Share your view and explain how you have addressed the topics that you are talking about. For example, a management skills talk shouldn’t just be about the theory. You should share a few war stories around the challenges that you faced in your career and how you addressed them, illustrating how you utilised management theory / skills along the way. Discuss what went well, outline what you learned and give those key learning points as your closing summary.

It is not about you: Your talk is not about you. It is about them, the people who came to listen to you. When writing your talk, consider your audience. What do they want to hear about and what key points would be valuable learning points / take-aways for them?

Stick to the allotted time: Generally, presentations are built around a tight schedule. If you are asked to speak for 30 minutes, then aim for 25 or 26 minutes with time for questions at the end, if necessary. Your audience will not thank you for running over (some even consider it to be bad manners) but they will never complain if you finish slightly early. The key is to rehearse your timings which will also help your talk to flow as you will be more familiar with it. After all, practice makes (almost) perfect.

STAMP DUTY ON SECOND HOMES

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STAMP DUTY ON SECOND HOMES

Since 1 April 2016 there has been a 3% supplementary Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) charge payable on the purchase of second and subsequent residential properties costing more than £40,000. This was clearly aimed at buy-to-let investors as well as those buying second homes.

Note that this additional 3% charge does not apply where the main residence is replaced.

Where the new main residence is bought before the old home is sold the 3% still has to be paid but is refunded if the old home is sold within 36 months.

HMRC COMPUTER ISN’T ALWAYS CORRECT

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HMRC COMPUTER ISN’T ALWAYS CORRECT

HM Revenue and Customs have acknowledged that their software and some commercial software used by accountants doesn’t always come up with the right amount of tax payable! You may have seen this reported in some newspapers such as the Daily Telegraph.

This arises because the tax system of different income tax personal allowances, dividend allowances, savings rates has become more complicated rather than getting simpler!

These anomalies only arise in certain limited circumstances depending on the combination of dividends, interest and other income and we can assure you that we will check that our software calculates the correct amount of your tax. We will ensure that where the HMRC computer system comes up with a different figure any anomalies are resolved.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT VS SALES

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BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT VS SALES

If you ask a group of business people to define what they think business development is, you will probably get a few different answers. Some people use the terms business development and sales interchangeably, while others consider them to be completely different.

Business development involves a considered and holistic approach which includes business strategy,

marketing, customer management, and partnerships. To use a golf analogy, the business development team is the caddy and the sales team is the golfer. The business development team is responsible for getting the sales team to the right golf course, setting them up on the first tee, advising on the weather conditions, where to hit the ball and how hard to drive it off the tee. They then hand the club to the sales team who hit the ball and try to get it to the hole with a minimum number of shots.

So, does business development have something to do with sales? Yes, it does. Is it related to business growth? Yes absolutely. Does it have anything to do with business strategy? Very much so. Business development is a culmination of these different activities but most importantly, it’s all about considering things from the client’s perspective. Why would they buy from your firm? What is the benefit to them of doing so? How can you ensure that they have a superior experience with your firm than they would with your competitors? The client only cares about the problem they are currently facing and is only interested in your firm if you identify a need/problem that you can solve and provide a solution for. It’s all about the value that you can provide to the client, at a cost that they consider to be acceptable.

The goal of business development is to create a partnership which is based on value. It entails cultivating a relationship with the client and providing a product or service that could result in an ongoing relationship, whether that is by way of repeat purchases or referrals from the client. In summary, business development is all about developing relationships with customers, creating a strategy that adds value for your clients and which works in tandem with your sales team. In contrast to this, sales on its own, is more transaction oriented.

Supporting Your Team – Communication

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Supporting Your Team – Communication

Give feedback and communicate:
If you don’t tell your team how they are doing, how can you expect them to improve? Providing performance feedback and communicating team objectives will encourage your team to continually improve. It can be useful to have monthly or fortnightly meetings with team members to assess projects and check-in with them. Enthusiastic team members will often seek growth opportunities and want to take on new challenges or tasks. By communicating the objectives of the team and giving regular feedback, you open the door for productive two-way conversations with your team.

Supporting Your Team – Be Available When They Need You

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Supporting Your Team – Be Available When They Need You

Be available when they need you:
A common complaint in many businesses is that managers simply aren’t available. Managers communicate when they hand down projects or tasks, but other than that, they tend to be unreachable. A great manager will always be available and will always make an effort to ensure employees have everything they need to get the job done.

Supporting Your Team – Listen, Motivate, Inspire

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bc sunderland team

Supporting Your Team – Listen, Motivate, Inspire

Listen, motivate and inspire them:
Listen for ideas, insights and ways to improve your business. Listening can help you to identify red flags and threats to the firm. It is a manager’s responsibility to remove any roadblocks, help resolve challenges and deal with negative issues. One of the most effective things a good manager can do is encourage great energy and talent in order to motivate their people. It is important to inspire your team by staying positive.

Supporting Your Team – Encourage Self Management

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self management

Supporting Your Team – Encourage Self Management

As a manager, you have a great deal on your plate the majority of the time. But one of the most important things (if not the most important thing) you can do is to make time to support your team.

The best managers will step back and let their team do their job without standing over their shoulders. Encourage your team to manage themselves. You can assign personal objectives to each member and empower them to succeed and do what they do well. Give them the opportunity to make decisions and don’t second guess them. Remind them that if they need support, they can come to you.

Vacancy – Qualified AAT / Part Qualified ACCA Student

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job vacancy

We are currently seeking a qualified AAT / part qualified ACCA student to join our team. BC Sunderland Driver have been work with owner managed businesses ensuring they get the best service and becoming their trusted advisors.

The role will include the preparation of accounts and the relevant tax returns from a diverse base of owner managed businesses, as well as helping clients with their other accounting needs including bookkeeping, VAT Returns, payroll and auto-enrolments and management accounts.

We are a team that likes to get involved with helping our clients, and the role will be client facing.

Ideally the candidate will have experience in a small /medium sized independent practice, and will currently be involved in the preparation of accounts and relevant tax returns for client.

Most importantly, the candidate will show the willingness to work along side business owners to help them grow their businesses.

Trading Or A Capital Gain?

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farmers land

Trading Or A Capital Gain?

Farmers and other landowners will often be approached by developers seeking to obtain planning permission to build on the land. Great care is needed to avoid unnecessary tax charges on the transaction. HMRC have recently updated their guidance on transactions in land clarifying that under certain circumstances some of the eventual profit can be taxed as income not a capital gain. For individual property owners that could mean 45% income tax as opposed to just 28% CGT.

For example, a landowner sells some land to a developer for £5 million plus 10% of any profit on the development over £6 million. If the profit on the project was £8 million then the additional £200,000 would be taxed as a trading profit.
The tax rules in this area are complex. If you are involved in such a deal contact us so we can advise on the best way of structuring the transaction.